In Vivo Wettability of HydraGlyde® Silicone Hydrogel Lens With and Without HydraGlyde® Containing Lens Care Solution

Main Article Content

Shi Jie Wong
Fakhruddin Barodawala
Azam N. H. Azmi

Abstract

Contact lens care solutions are readily available over-the-counter at any pharmacy, optical shop, or eye care specialist centers. The use of a non-compatible solution may damage or alter the material of the contact lens, and may cause changes in the efficiency of the lens, thereby reducing comfort of the wearer. Hence, this research was carried out to determine the wettability of HydraGlyde® Silicone Hydrogel lens with and without HydraGlyde® containing lens care solutions. The right eye of 25 subjects (mean age: 22.8 ± 1.3 years old) were studied. The subjects needed to come for two visits [1 week apart] at approximately the same time of the day. Each subject received the pre-soaked lenses with and without HydraGlyde® Moisture Matrix randomly. The subjects wore the lenses for 8 h. Non-Invasive Tear Breakup Time (NIKBUT) was measured using OCULUS® Keratograph 5M, followed by a subjective questionnaire response.
Parametric paired t-test showed no significant differences in PLTF NIKBUT baseline (16.25 ± 3.75 s)
and after 8 h of lens wear (15.02 ± 3.81 s) when lenses soaked in a solution with HydraGlyde® Moisture Matrix (p > 0.05). However, a significant difference was found in PLTF NIKBUT baseline (16.16 ± 2.79 s), and after 8 h of lens wear (14.74 ± 3.73 s) when lenses were soaked in a solution without HydraGlyde® Moisture Matrix (p < 0.05). The change in the PLTF NIKBUT baseline and after 8 h of lens wear for the solution with and without HydraGlyde® Moisture Matrix (−1.23 ± 3.89 s and 1.68 ± 3.58 s respectively) were not statistically significant (p > 0.05). The subjective questionnaire revealed a preference towards a solution with HydraGlyde® Moisture Matrix with a mean score of 68.84 ± 15.36% compared to without HydraGlyde® Moisture Matrix with a mean score of 62.80 ± 14.00% (p < 0.05). A lens care solution con-taining HydraGlyde® Moisture Matrix is advised to be prescribed along with HydraGlyde® silicone hydrogel lens to achieve optimum lens performance.

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Author Biographies

Shi Jie Wong, SEGi University, Selangor, Malaysia

Faculty of Optometry and Vision Sciences, SEGi University, Selangor, Malaysia

Fakhruddin Barodawala, SEGi University, Selangor, Malaysia

Faculty of Optometry and Vision Sciences, SEGi University, Selangor, Malaysia

Azam N. H. Azmi, SEGi University, Selangor, Malaysia

Faculty of Optometry and Vision Sciences, SEGi University, Selangor, Malaysia

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